Sunflowers Decontaminate Japan Soil

Add a comment May 26th, 2012  
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Sunflowers Decontaminate Japan Soil, Environment campaigners in Japan are asking the public to plant sunflowers to help decontaminate the soil of whatever radioactive material that seeped through the ground. Fukushima prefecture’s young entrepreneurs and civil servants groups have distributed sunflower seeds to the stricken area to help lessen the radioactive contaminants in the soil.

“We will give the seeds sent back by people for free to farmers, the public sector and other groups next year,” said project leader Shinji Handa in an interview. “The goal is a landscape so yellow that it will surprise even NASA. The sunflower is a new symbol of hope and reconstruction and to eventually lure back tourists.”

Almost 10,000 packets of sunflower seeds at 500 yen (S$7.70) each have so far been sold to some 30,000 people, including to the city of Yokohama near Tokyo, which is growing sunflowers in 200 parks, Mr Handa said.

  1. May 27th, 2012 at 21:45 | #1
    Steve Enns

    What a great idea for the Midwest to help out Japan! Being from the “Sunflower State” of Kansas, I know about the oil and the tasty seeds! Also remember the old Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant near Lawrence. I must assume no nuclear weapons were assembled or disassembled there because you never saw a lot of sunflowers on the property and they’ve been developing the land for commercial and residential use on the last few years.

  2. May 27th, 2012 at 22:49 | #2
    shel phillips

    I would be very interested to know if there is a way that other people can purchase packets of the seeds, as a donation, to help with the planting process. I’m sure that there are plenty of people worldwide that would be interested in helping out. This has effected all of us & I’m sure that those of us who are able, would love to be a part of the solution. So if anyone knows how it can be done, please post the information.
    Thank you, shel phillips

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